5 Key Considerations to Prevent Professional Negligence in A Claim or Lawsuit.

5 Key Considerations to Prevent Professional Negligence in A Claim or Lawsuit.

5 Key Considerations to Prevent Professional Negligence in A Claim or Lawsuit.

As regulated professionals, solo practitioners are directly accountable to clients. It is imperative to develop and maintain policies and procedures based on evidence, best practice guidelines, Professional standards and practice standards.

 

 

As a solo practitioner, you will have extensive professional expertise in the practice area related to your business. However, sometimes things can go wrong, even a single groundless claim against your practice can run into financial distress. Particularly problematic for solo practitioners who are the most likely to risk operating without malpractice coverage and also most likely not to have the financial resources to field this kind of expense if it does occur

  1. Make sure you practise within your scope of practice and individual competencies

Health care professionals may specialize in one or two areas.  While it can be tempting to undertake activities within your scope that are not within your individual competencies, if you are not fully competent in that area, you are laying yourself open to potential problems.

  1. Keep up to Date With your Practice

Number 1 is especially important if you’ve been practising for a long time and specializing in certain areas within your practice.  The alternative practice area you consider taking on could be very different now to when you learned about it.  So, make sure you keep up to date with anything connected to your practice, plus anything that you are thinking of adding to your services.

  1. Take Responsibility

As a regulated professional and business owner, you are ultimately responsible for ensuring that the operation of your practice supports the best outcomes for your clients. What this means is that if you or someone working on behalf of your business makes a mistake that harms a client, you are responsible and could find yourself facing legal consequences.

Ensure you have robust systems and procedures in place to guard against malpractice.

  1. Set Expectations via Consent

Make sure that you are transparent, thoughtful, and realistic in your communications with clients to avoid any misunderstanding.  Communicate from the start possible outcomes and ensure that your client and their family have realistic expectations.  A common cause of malpractice suits is failure to communicate clearly with clients and effectively set realistic expectations. When you think about it: if a client thinks that you have guaranteed a positive outcome that doesn’t occur, they may think you made a mistake, and you might find yourself in court for the wrong reasons.

Even claims that don’t have validity could be expensive, time-consuming and damaging to your reputation.

  1. Be accountable at all times

Everybody makes mistakes. However careful you are to avoid any mistakes; they are still going to happen from time to time.

Making sure you have adequate systems in place to minimize consequences and protect your clients, is a must.

Don’t ever be tempted to hide or cover a mistake and have that ethos as part of your private practice ever!

Remember, professional Practice is Good PracticeHaving the right professional liability insurance and business insurance is essential for protection.  The element of awareness and procedures in place to avoid malpractice claims are an essential part of your professional practice.

Disclaimer: This information is provided in an attempt to heighten sensitivity, increase awareness, and enhance judgments on this topic. We encourage our audience to contact their legal advisor and regulatory body to learn more. CompanyOn does not represent or speak on behalf of any regulatory body. 

At CompanyOn, we’re committed to supporting our community of solo practitioners, no matter where they are in pursuing professional independence. If you are interested in a particular topic you would like us to discuss, please let us know at [email protected].

Related Resources:

British Columbia College of Nurses and Midwives

College of Nurse of Ontario

College and Association of Registered Nurses of Alberta

College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Alberta

College of Registered Nurses of Manitoba

College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Manitoba

Canadian Nurses Association

Canadian Nurses Protective Society

Canadian Association of Foot Care Nurses

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Inspiring Trust: 5 ways to Keep Clients Loyal.

Inspiring Trust: 5 ways to Keep Clients Loyal.

Inspiring Trust: Ways to Keep Clients Loyal

Loyal clients are one of your most valuable assets

 

 

Ongoing care of an existing client is much more efficient than chasing down new clients.  Loyal clients and their loyal families will lead to more work by word of mouth referrals.  In fact, the more clients you obtain by referral, the smaller your marketing budget can be.

Here’s some tips how to inspire client loyalty, and what to consider as you put together your client retention strategy:

Inspiring Trust

For clients being dependent on someone else for their care can be a frightening time. It may be scary to entrust their welfare and future to a stranger.  Needing care can be overwhelming, and family members may have personal conflict about your role.

 Where this is leading is to say that inspiring trust is more than an important part of your practice; it’s vital to keep your clients coming back and motivate them and their loved ones to spread the word about your business.

Three ways to do just that:

Be Dependable

There’s nothing more stressful than entrusting a big part of your life to somebody who is unpredictable. Always aim to arrive on time and if you cannot let your client know.

If you find you keep running late, consider revising your round or altering your timings to more realistic arrival times to keep your clients happy.

Always respond to emails from clients or family member as soon as possible, answer the phone or respond to voicemails or missed calls promptly during working hours.

Always Follow Through

Proving that you can be counted on to provide the services you’ve been asked for and sometimes a bit more, gives your clients peace of mind that you always follow through. Little things, done well are great ways to keep them enthusiastic about being your client.

Stay in Touch

Just like personal ones, business relationships require a little tending to flourish. Utilize 21st-century tech to keep your clients engaged.

Be Human

At the end of the day, we’re all human, while it is important to maintain a professional-client relationship; learning just how much of an emotional connection you can build with clients helps them to look forward to your visit and help to retain loyalty. Thankfully, being professional doesn’t mean that you have to be a robot.

As a health care professional, there is the opportunity to let your personality shine through as part of your brand voice.  There is nothing wrong with keeping your work time strictly formal and based on the job.  Although allowing a little of your humor or personality shine through may actually help your clients welfare.

At CompanyOn, we’re committed to supporting our community of solo practitioners, no matter the path they are in, in their pursuit of professional independence.

With CompanyOn by your side, business really is that simple.

Ready to make the switch?

Try Our Platform Free for 21 days.

See CompanyOn in Action

Schedule A Free 1:1 Personalized Demo

7 New Year Resolutions To Increase Efficiencies Within Your Independent Practice.

7 New Year Resolutions To Increase Efficiencies Within Your Independent Practice.

Seven New Year Resolutions That Would Change How You Run Your Independent Practice.

 

 

As we say goodbye to 2020 and its unique challenges, at CompanyOn we want to share with our amazing community of solo practitioners, 7 resolutions to increase efficiencies and incorporate best practices with your business in 2021.

Which ones do you already implement within your practice and which ones are you going you adopt?

At CompanyOn, we’re committed to supporting our community of solo practitioners, no matter if they are just thinking in pursuing professional independence, or they are already well established solo practitioners. 

To learn more about these benefits and many more, sign up for your free trial or book a demo. Don’t just take us at our word with regards to these many benefits either, have a look through our positive customer testimonials online to see how our services can improve your solo practitioner business today!

With CompanyOn by your side, business really is that simple.

Ready to make the switch?

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See CompanyOn in Action

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Building Therapeutic Relationships with Clients: What to Consider.

Building Therapeutic Relationships with Clients: What to Consider.

Building Therapeutic Relationships with Clients: What to Consider.

When building relationships with clients, as regulated professionals, solo practitioners are in a unique position of trust, power and influence.

 

 

It is for these reasons that a great deal of responsibility and attention needs to be considered on the nature of the relationship you build with your clients.

Following are best practice considerations  based on the stage of such relationship:

Accepting Clients

Accepting or refusing clients must be based on the ability to provide safe, competent and ethical care based on the client’s health-care needs. 

As a regulated professional, make sure to practise within your standards of practice, but more importantly, within your individual competencies. There may be cases in which you need to care for someone in a collaborative way with another health care provider to meet the client’s need.

Refusing Clients

You have an obligation to provide safe, competent and ethical care to your clients.  The circumstances acceptable for refusing care provision are limited.

Any decision should be considered using an ethical problem-solving approach, as a way to consider the care factors that are relevant and to decide if it is within your scope of practice.

You cannot refuse a client if, for example, their care would be too time-consuming for you or the complexity of care that is within your competencies is too troublesome.  Refusing to enter into a therapeutic relationship because the client’s health issues are complex does not meet the standards of practice.

You may ethically and correctly refuse to accept a client when the required care is beyond your competencies or scope.

If a client requests written confirmation that you are willing to accept them as a client, you must provide this.  There is a right for clients to know why care is refused. Although, you must use your judgement to consider if revealing this information will threaten the mental or physical safety of the client or others.

Ending a Therapeutic Relationship

The therapeutic relationship is built on trust, respect and professionalism. The client must be aware that the nurse visit is professional and not social.  Outlining the therapeutic nurse-client relationship in writing at the start may help prevent possible conflicts.

You must have reasonable grounds to end a therapeutic relationship, such as:

The client

  • poses a risk to other clients, staff or yourself
  • is abusive
  • refuses to respect professional boundaries
  •  behaves inappropriately
  • Or you need to cease urgently due to illness or urgent circumstances.

When deciding to end a therapeutic relationship, you must notify the client or their representative.   Have reasonable grounds for doing so. Consider documenting the reasons on the client record.

Disclaimer: This information is provided in an attempt to heighten sensitivity, increase awareness, and enhance judgments on this topic. We encourage our audience to contact their regulatory body or legal advisor to learn more. CompanyOn does not represent or speak on behalf of any regulatory body. 

At CompanyOn, we’re committed to supporting our community of solo practitioners, no matter the stage of their enterprise. If there are topics you would like us to discuss as part of our newsletter, please send us know via our social media.

Related Resources:

British Columbia College of Nurses and Midwives

College of Nurse of Ontario

College and Association of Registered Nurses of Alberta

College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Alberta

College of Registered Nurses of Manitoba

College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Manitoba

Canadian Nurses Association

Canadian Nurses Protective Society

Canadian Association of Foot Care Nurses

Ready to make the switch?

Try Our Platform Free for 21 days.

See CompanyOn in Action

Schedule A Free 1:1 Personalized Demo

5 Best Practice Tips on Risk Management And Quality Improvement for Solo Practitioners.

5 Best Practice Tips on Risk Management And Quality Improvement for Solo Practitioners.

5 Best Practice Tips on Risk Management And Quality Improvement for Solo Practitioners.

It is important for regulated solo practitioners to be committed to ongoing quality improvement and risk management of their practice.

 

 

Ensuring safe and effective provision of care services is paramount for the establishment, maintenance and growth of any business. One key step to accomplish this,  is committing to developing policies and procedures that address risks and quality assurance of your private practice.

Following are 5 Best practice tips for maintaining a quality practice:

1. Recording regular feedback from clients

Incorporate as part of your practice the ability for your clients to share their feedback on the care you provide. Knowing what is working and what could improve, will help your solo practice improve the quality of care you deliver to your clients. You can use CompanyOn’s online forms to create and send a survey template to collect this information.

2. Measuring and documenting client care outcomes

Schedule times within your practice to review how your clients are progressing based on the care and treatments you provide is good practice. CompanyOn’s electronic documentation system allows to chronologically and in detail chart the care you provide and the ability to update care plans whenever you need. 

3. Awareness of laws related to your profession

Continuously, visit and review your regulatory and public health standards of practice and policies related to your practice and business. 

4. Consulting with peers and role models

Joining a professional network to discuss professional challenges and successes is of immense help. They provide you with resources and support that positively can impact your independent practice.

5. Regular review and revision of policies and procedures

As a regulated professional,  you are responsible to manage any risk and/or liabilities your practice can incur in. As you are directly accountable to your clients, it is essential that you develop policies and procedures to support your business and the welfare of your clients, employees and yourself. You should base these on evidence, best practice guidelines, and standards from your regulatory body.

Disclaimer: This information is provided in an attempt to heighten sensitivity, increase awareness, and enhance judgments on this topic. We encourage our audience to contact their legal advisor and regulatory body to learn more. CompanyOn does not represent or speak on behalf of any regulatory body. 

At CompanyOn, we’re committed to supporting our community of solo practitioners, no matter if they are just thinking in pursuing professional independence, or they are already well established solo practitioners. 

Related Resources:

British Columbia College of Nurses and Midwives

College of Nurse of Ontario

College and Association of Registered Nurses of Alberta

College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Alberta

College of Registered Nurses of Manitoba

College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Manitoba

Canadian Nurses Association

Canadian Nurses Protective Society

Canadian Association of Foot Care Nurses

Ready to make the switch?

Try Our Platform Free for 21 days.

See CompanyOn in Action

Schedule A Free 1:1 Personalized Demo